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Corporation

Support for Aboriginal Entrepreneurs and Small Business in Canada: Mapping the Options [Center for Indigenous Economic Development and Entrepreneurship, CIEDE]

Publisher: 
Center for Indigenous Economic Development and Entrepreneurship (CIEDE)
Year of publication: 
2007

"This paper profiles a number of national, regional, and local Aboriginal (Indian, Métis, and Inuit) and non-Aboriginal government sponsored programs and services that promote and support Aboriginal entrepreneurs and small business owners in Canada. Various non-governmental and private support programs intended to support the development and success of Aboriginal entrepreneurs – available through various financial, corporate, academic, and Aboriginal institutions – are also profiled.

An Exploration of Joint Venture as a Sustainable Development Tool for First Nations [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2002

"The focus of this discussion is the joint venture that can allow First Nations to enter the resource development and service industries. It can provide incomes, as ell as revenue that can be used to support social spending. Potential benefits of joint ventures include access to the capital, technology, expertise, market access and other benefits offered by a corporate partner."

Indigenous Land Rights in Canada: The Foundation for Development? [International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, IJESB

Publisher: 
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (IJESB)
Year of publication: 
2005

"Throughout the middle decades of the 20th Century Indigenous people were the target of efforts to assist in economic development. In large part these externally developed, modernisation based efforts failed. In response, a second wave of Indigenous development has emerged; one in which Indigenous peoples are striving to rebuild their ‘nations’ and improve their lot through economic development ‘on their own terms’. Key to this approach is the pursuit by Indigenous people of the recognition of their rights to their traditional lands and resources.

First Nations Economic Development: The Medow Lake Tribal Council [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"A new approach to economic development is emerging among the First Nations in Canada. This approach emphasizes the creation of profitable businesses competing in the global economy. These businesses are expected to help First Nations achieve their broader objectives that include: (i) greater control of activities on their traditional lands, (ii) self-determination, and (iii) an end to dependency through economic self-sufficiency.

Brand Membertou: Walking in Two Different Worlds [Cape Breton University, CBU]

Publisher: 
Cape Breton University (CBU)
Year of publication: 
2006

"Bernd Christmas, CEO of Membertou First Nation near Sydney, NS, ponders some obstacles which he and his staff have encountered over the past number of years, in their quest to establish a strong brand and strong brand recognition for this First Nation community of 1100. They realize Membertou’s journey from a community with a massive operating deficit and escalating welfare costs, to one with budget surpluses and economic renewal has been seen as a model for First Nations development in Canada.

Development Corporations in Aboriginal Communities: The Canadian Experience [Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship]

Publisher: 
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship
Year of publication: 
2009

"This study examines the historical development of corporate governance structures in First Nations communities in British Columbia, where development corporations are employed to assist privately-owned and community-owned entrepreneurial enterprises. First Nations entrepreneurial activity functions in an environment where business must market to a global economy while preserving traditional values, beliefs and other cultural elements. A brief history of First Nations and their enterprise development efforts is presented.

Corporations Canada: Dissolving a Corporation [Canada Business Network, CBN]

Publisher: 
Government of Canada
Year of publication: 
2012

There are a few steps you must follow for the voluntary dissolution (legal termination) of your corporation. The procedure varies slightly depending on the situation. Voluntary dissolution can happen:

Incorporate a Business Corporation [Government du Québec]

Publisher: 
Government du Québec
Year of publication: 
2012

A business corporation is an entity that has, subject to the conditions stipulated by law, a juridical personality and possesses specific rights and obligations. The liability of the shareholders is limited to their investment.

Business Incorporation and Registration (Nova Scotia) [Canada Business Network, CBN]

Publisher: 
Government of Canada
Year of publication: 
2012

To operate an incorporated business in Nova Scotia, you must apply through the Registry of Joint Stock Companies.

Registry of Companies (Newfoundland and Labrador) [Canada Business Network, CBN]

Publisher: 
Government of Canada
Year of publication: 
2012

In Newfoundland and Labrador, you must register with the Registry of Companies if you decide to incorporate provincially. You can also incorporate a co-operative through the Registry.

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by Dr. Radut