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Corporations

Strengthening Corporate-Aboriginal Relations: The Influence of Public Policies and Institutions

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2003

"Although they express optimism, Canadian executives see more barriers than enablers in the public policies and institutions that influence their economic relationships with Aboriginal people.

Aboriginal land rights and development: corporations and trust [International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, IJESB]

Publisher: 
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (IJESB)
Year of publication: 
2005

"Aboriginal people are seeking to regain control over their traditional lands and resources. Among other things, they expect these land and resources to form the foundation upon which they can rebuild their economies and communities. Aboriginal people want to pursue this development on their own terms. However many realise that success requires effective competition in the global economy and this in turn requires capacity beyond land and resource. One method of acquiring the needed capacity is through alliances with non-aboriginal corporations.

Inter-Indigenous development aid: markets, corporations and biases [The Canadian Geographer]

Publisher: 
The Canadian Geographer
Year of publication: 
2011

"The Canadian government and the Meadow Lake Tribal Council sponsored a forest extraction corporation in eastern Nicaragua that restructured 16 Miskitu and Mayangna villages and transformed local human-environment interactions. The Central American aid project demonstrated paternalistic and interventionist tendencies and exposed biases in inter-Indigenous aid that rendered it inseparable from conventional aid.

Developing An Economic Partnership Framework Between The Lheidli T'enneh First Nation And Initiatives Prince George Development Corporation [Journal of Business & Economics Research]

Publisher: 
Journal of Business & Economics Research
Year of publication: 
2011

"Both non-aboriginal corporations and First Nation bands are recognizing the benefits of forming economic partnerships. Each First Nation is unique and economic partnerships have to be designed to fit the partners’ capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a framework for an economic partnership between the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation and the Initiatives Prince George Development Corporation. This framework was intended to offer structure, engagement, and guidance to that partnership.

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by Dr. Radut