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Ecology

Ecosystem management and forestry planning in Labrador: how does Aboriginal involvement affect management plans? [Canadian Journal of Forest Research, CJFR]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Forest Research (CJFR)
Year of publication: 
2011

"Aboriginal peoples are increasingly being invited to participate in sustainable forest management processes as a means of including their knowledge, values, and concerns. However, it is justifiable to ask if this participation does lead to changes in forest management plans and to outcomes in management activities. We review four forest management plans over 10 years (1999–2009) in Labrador, Canada, to determine if increasing involvement by the Aboriginal Innu Nation has led to changes in plan content.

Ethnographies of Selected Reserves [Cape Breton University, CBU]

Publisher: 
Cape Breton University (CBU)
Year of publication: 
2012

The following ethnographies were researched and compiled by Mi'kmaw students hired through Aboriginal L.I.N.K.S. Each is a compendium of information about Nova Scotia reserves with regard to physical description including size, location, and proximity to other towns or villages; what businesses and other concerns comprise the reserves, including private businesses and band operated businesses; services and facilities available in the communities; and the names of the people who make up the band councils, administration, and educational institutions.

Impact of Delgamuukw Guidelines in Atlantic Canada [Cape Breton University, CBU]

Publisher: 
Cape Breton University (CBU)
Year of publication: 
1999

In Delgamuukw v. British Columbia, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed the inherent meaning of Aboriginal tenure (or title) and acknowledged its role in constitutional analysis. The message from the modern framers of the constitution of Canada and the Lamer Court is that Aboriginal law, tenure and rights as well as treaty rights constitute a distinct constitutional order in s. 35(1) of the Constitution Act, 1982, with its own implicate architecture, sources, traditions, and texts, that require constitutional equality with the other parts.

Historical Overview: Mi'kma'ki - Mi'kmaw Homeland [Cape Breton University, CBU]

Publisher: 
Cape Breton University (CBU)
Year of publication: 
2012

Mi'kmaw people depended on the land for their sustenance and as such were a nomadic people who lived and travelled throughout Mi'kma'ki according to the time of year and the seasonal pattern. Mi'kma'ki was divided into seven districts:Kespukwitk, Sipekni'katik, Eskikewa'kik, Unama'kik, Epekwitk aq Piktuk, Siknikt, and Kespek. Consequently, in an effort to maintain orderly conduct and good relationships between families, travel throughout Mi'kma'ki was based on respect for those whose hunting territory one may be travelling through.

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by Dr. Radut