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Five Pillars of Effective Governance [National Center for First Nation Governance, NCFNG]

Publisher: 
National Center for First Nation Governance (NCFNG)
Year of publication: 
2012

"Five Pillars of Effective Governance is now available as a PDF booklet and can be viewed at fngovernance.org/pillars. Learn about The People, The Land, Laws & Jurisdiction, Institutions, Resources – pillars for developing effective, independent First Nations governance. The booklet introduces a key set of principles that helps to blend traditional values with the modern realities of self-governance. These principles, developed in think tanks and dialogue with indigenous governance experts, form the foundation for NCFNG’s philosophy and services. "

Government Administration and Financial Management [National Center for First Nation Governance, NCFNG]

Publisher: 
National Center for First Nation Governance (NCFNG)
Year of publication: 
2005

Information regarding the First Nations Governance Act as it relates to administration and financial management.

Making First Nation Law: The Listugui Mi'kmaq Fishery [National Center for First Nation Governance, NCFNG]

Publisher: 
National Center for First Nation Governance (NCFNG)
Year of publication: 
2010

"On May 19, 1993, the Listuguj Mi’gmaq First Nation Government took over the management of the salmon fishery in the Restigouche River where it flows between the provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec – waters the Listuguj Mi’gmaq people had fished for many generations. They did so not under a contract with provincial or federal authorities – the province of Quebec in fact opposed them. Nor did they do it by asking permission or receiving a request from some other government – they asked no permission and received no such requests.

Another Route to Native Prosperity: Property Rights [Terry Anderson and Dominic Parker]

Publisher: 
Fraser Forum
Year of publication: 
2012

"The essay summarizes the authors study Sovereignty, Credible Commitments, and Economic Prosperity on American Indian Reservations, which measures the crippling economic consequences resulting from the lack of private property rights on Indian reserves."

Individual Property Rights on Canadian Indian Reserves [Christopher Alcantara]

Publisher: 
The Canadian Journal of Native Studies XXIII
Year of publication: 
2002

"There are four different but overlapping regimes of private-property rights-customary rights, certificates of possession, land codes under the First Nations Land Management Act, and leases-already exist on reserves across Canada, as do several unique regimes, such as the Sechelt and Nisga'a cases. These various regimes are worthy of serious study by economists, lawyers, and political scientists with a view to establishing how well they work and how they might be perfected for the benefit of First Nations."

Colonialism and State Dependency [National Aboriginal Health Organization, NAHO]

Publisher: 
National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO)
Year of publication: 
2009

"This paper conceptualizes colonialism from an indigenous perspective and analyses the effects of colonization on First nations, with particular focus on explaining the fundamental roots of the psychophysical crises and dependency of First Nations upon the State. Central to its analysis is the effect of colonially-generated cultural disruptions that component the effects of dispossession to create near total psychological, physical and financial dependency on the state.

Legal Aspects of Aboriginal Business Development [LexisNexis Canada]

Publisher: 
LexisNexis Canada
Year of publication: 
2005

"Today is a time of economic rebirth for Aboriginal people in Canada. The federal government has committed billions of dollars to Aboriginal business initiatives, and courts are actively settling a range of claims. Innovative business models, new forms of property, and daring ventures and partnerships flourish across Canada, with many more planned. [...] Contributors include experienced practitioners and foremost academics of Aboriginal law from Canada and the United States.

Challenging the Deficit Paradigm: Grounds for Optimism Among First Nations in Canada [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)
Year of publication: 
2001

"In contrast to the deficit paradigm's view of First Nations as victims beset with numerous problems e focus on positive developments for First Nations in Canada since the 1969 White paper. Four areas are examined: self-government, organizational capacity, structures of opportunity, and resistance to oppression. A profound transformation of the First Nation sociological landscape is observed as First Nation interests have become vested in the Canadian state, marginalization has diminished substantially, and structures of opportunity have opened."

AFM 3 - Business Law [Aboriginal Financial Officers Association, AFOA]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Financial Officers Association (AFOA)

This is the third course in the Certified Aboriginal Financial Manager Program. It offers Aboriginal financial managers the opportunity to learn about legal and legislative requirements and practices that occur in activities undertaken by Aboriginal organizations.

Aboriginal Participation in Forest Management Not Just Another Stakeholder [National Aboriginal Forestry Association, NAFA]

Publisher: 
National Aboriginal Forestry Association
Year of publication: 
2000

This paper is intended to provide a greater understanding of the nature of Aboriginal and treaty rights and how they interface with emerging forest policy. When one examines the essence of Aboriginal and treaty rights an early observation must be that these rights are largely about continued use of the forests. This obvious linkage has never been reconciled in forest policy, and where it counts most - at the provincial level. Only now is there some evidence that change may occur.

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by Dr. Radut