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Partnership

Creating the conditions for economic success on reserve lands: A report on the experiences of 25 First Nation communities [Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, AANDC]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Year of publication: 
2013

“This report is part of ongoing work at Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to address the barriers to economic development on reserve lands. Its results will be used to inform next steps in partnership with First Nations to help create the conditions for economic success.”

Business First: Aboriginal Business Newsletter, April 2010, Issue One [Derek A. Simon]

Publisher: 
Burchells LLP
Year of publication: 
2010

This newsletter is issue one for “Aboriginal-owned businesses and their partners” containing a piece written by Derek Simon regarding fallacies that stop non-Aboriginal businesses from entering into partnership with Aboriginal communities and businesses.

Achieving Progressive Community Relations: Key Findings from CCAB [Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, CCAB]

Publisher: 
Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB)

"This report analyzes data submitted by Canadian companies between 2001 and 2008 as a part of the Progressive Aboriginal Relations program (PAR) – a benchmarking tool developed by the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB). PAR was designed to help Canadian business organizations gauge and improve their commitment to progressive relationships with First Nation, Métis and Inuit communities, businesses and people. To date, a total of 38 companies – representing diverse sectors and geographic locations – have undertaken the PAR process.

Aboriginal Participation in Major Resource Development Opportunities [Public Policy Forum]

Publisher: 
Public Policy Forum
Year of publication: 
2012

"This national roundtable series convened leaders from Canada’s natural resources sector, Aboriginal communities and the public sector. The themes and issues discussed are summarized in the attached documents. A number of key themes were reflected in the dialogue, including: Labour Market Development; Community Readiness; Financing and Financial Literacy; Partnerships and Collaboration; Measurements of Success; Best Practices and Case Studies."

From Digital Divide to Digital Opportunities - Aboriginal Voice [Public Policy Forum]

Publisher: 
Public Policy Forum
Year of publication: 
2006

"As the Information Age transforms Canadian society, Aboriginal Canadians can not risk being left behind. According to this report, information and communications technologies (ICT) "offer critical opportunities to strengthen Aboriginal cultural identities, promote sustainable community development and achieve greater self-reliance." These national recommendations reveal a critical opportunity for Canada's First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples to leapfrog into the Information Age."

Partnering Among Aboriginal Communities: Tribal Councils Investment Group (TCIG) [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2002

"In keeping with the goal of sustainability, the First Nations of Manitoba identified a need for an investment vehicle that would allow them to participate in economic initiatives on a larger project-level than could be achieved by individual communities. By working together, they could access the capital necessary to build a capital pol that would then be available for further investment. The profits return to communities for use in whatever way they choose. The vehicle formed to meet these goals is Tribal Councils Investment Group (ICIG)"

Digging Beneath the Surface of Aboriginal Labour Market Development: Analyzing Policy Discourse in the Context of Northern Alberta's Oil Sands [Aboriginal Policy Studies, APS]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Policy Studies (APS)
Year of publication: 
2011

"This paper provides an analysis of policy discourse as it concerns Indigenous labour market development in Northern Alberta. In the process, the authors unearth the manner in which current federal and provincial government policy obscures a long history of attempted colonial domination with respect to Indigenous peoples in Canada more generally. Typically, economic booms are spoken of as an opportunity to democratize labour opportunities, through the discourse of “partnership” and “social inclusion” in particular.

Beyond the Blue and Green: The Need to Consider Aboriginal Peoples' Relationships to Resource Development in Labor-Environment Campaigns [Labor Studies Journal]

Publisher: 
Labor Studies Journal
Year of publication: 
2011

"In this article, I argue that labor researchers in North America need to engage more thoroughly with Indigenous studies if they hope to advance social and environmental justice. First, I suggest that researchers approach Aboriginal peoples’ relationships to the environment by supporting Aboriginal rights to lands and resources. Second, and related to this point, I raise the issue of the need for Aboriginal-controlled development in northern Aboriginal communities.

Improving the Interface between Urban Municipalities and Aboriginal Communities [Canadian Journal of Urban Research]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Urban Research
Year of publication: 
2008

"The ways in which urban municipalities understand and work within the context of Aboriginal community aspirations and needs will affect the quality of future urban development, in physical, social, economic and cultural sectors. Planning is central to shaping the institutional arrangements to help actualise Aboriginal community aspirations.

Relating Practice to Theory in Indigenous Entrepreneurship: a Pilot Investigation of the Kitsaki Partnership Portfolio [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2005

Article describes how economic participation must be on their own terms and for their own purposes. Also, traditional lands, history, culture and values all play a critical role in economic development. In order to attempt to compete in the global economy on their own terms, Indigenous people are using all types of partnerships, both among themselves and with non-Indigenous enterprises. A case study of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band is used as they are recognized as one of the leaders in economic development in Canada.

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by Dr. Radut