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Research

Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples [Linda Tuhiwai Smith]

Publisher: 
Zed Books Ltd.
Year of publication: 
1999

“This book acknowledges the significance of indigenous perspectives on research and attempts to account for how, and why, such perspectives may have developed.”

Risk-based De-identification [A Hundred Answers]

Publisher: 
A Hundred Answers
Year of publication: 
2015

“De-identification is particularly important in the health sector, where de-identifying data is often critical to enabling clinical research and analysis. In addition to masking production data for use in development and test systems, we have unique risk-based de-identification knowledge and services to help clients simplify complex testing and development systems while protecting privacy information. Specifically, we are knowledgeable and experienced in de-identifying health information to protect privacy while preserving data utility for clinical analysis.

Recommendations for the Renovation of Aboriginal Economic Development Programs [The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, NAEDB]

Publisher: 
The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board
Year of publication: 
2011

“The recommendations provided in this paper were developed in part through the NAEDB’s participation in these stakeholder engagement sessions, as well as through a review of key research and discussions with subject matter experts.”

The Process of Mi'kmaq Community-Based Development: A Case Study of the Bear River Mi'kmaq Npisunewawtu'j (Medicine Trail) Project [Collections Canada]

Publisher: 
Collections Canada
Year of publication: 
2000

"This study focuses on the process of a Mi'kmaq community-based development project entitled the Beur River Mi'kmaq Npisiinewmvfi~ (Medicine Trail) Project. The project is community-based and is focused on the cultural revitalization of traditional Mi'kmaq plant knowledge through the medium of an interpretive hiking trail. The main objective of this research was to document the conception and development of the project as a case study that illustrates the process of culture based Mi'kmaq community development."

Aboriginal Women and Community Development: Consistency Across Time [Collections Canada]

Publisher: 
Collections Canada
Year of publication: 
1998

"This study examines the consistencies between traditional and contemporary roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal women within the context of family and community development. The research sources for this work includes using: the Medicine Wheel teachings; reviewing relevant literature; and conducting personal interviews with Aboriginal women. "

Key Research Issues on Urban Aboriginal Economic Development [Aboriginal Business Development Centre, ABDC]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Business and Community Development Centre (ABDC)
Year of publication: 
2008

"This Research Issues Paper is intended to guide discussions in the first stage of the Network, by identifying an initial set of issues which arise from the academic literature on urban Aboriginal communities. The Paper is organized around a series of contexts that confront those as they work to develop their economies, participate in the wage economy, and develop a business sector. These include:
1) the socio-demographic context
2) the jurisdictional context
3) the policy context
4) the institutional context, and
5) the program context.

Key Research Issues in Urban Aboriginal Economic Development [Urban Aboriginal Economic Development, UAED]

Publisher: 
Urban Aboriginal Economic Development (UAED)
Year of publication: 
2009

"This paper is intended to guide network discussions by identifying an initial set of issues which arise from the academic literature on urban Aboriginal communities. The paper is organized around a series of contexts that confront those as they work to develop their economies, participate in the wage economy, and develop a business sector. These include the socio-demographic context, the jurisdictional context, the policy context, the institutional context and the program context.

Coast Salish Gathering [Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development]

Publisher: 
Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development (HPAIED)
Year of publication: 
2011

"The Coast Salish Gathering provides an environmental policy platform for the tribal and First Nations governments, state and provincial governments, and the US and Canadian federal governments—all of which have interests in the Salish Sea region—to discuss and determine effective environmental strategies and practices. Most important for the Coast Salish people, however, it amplifies their voice on the environmental issues that matter most to them: access to toxin-free traditional foods, adequate water quality and quantity, and collective climate change policies."

Historical Economic Perspectives of Aboriginal Peoples: Cycles of Balance and Partnership [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"Seeking understanding of Aboriginal peoples' place in today's society and ultimately for the future means understanding the history that has brought us here. It is not the history that solely acknowledges the Euro-Canadian perspective that will bring this understanding but it is an holistic approach that also respects the Aboriginal world view. This strategy draws on "ways of knowing" that honor written and oral traditions and is blended with a spiritual element that promotes a full appreciation for both approaches.

Segregation of Women and Aboriginal People Within Canada's Forest Sector by Industry and Occupation [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)
Year of publication: 
2006

"This study examines employment segregation by gender and by Aboriginal ancestry within Canada's forest sector in 2001. Results show that while gender segregation was principally by occupation, segregation by Aboriginal ancestry was principally by industry sub-sector. White women were over represented in clerical occupations and Aboriginal men were over represented in woods based industries. Patterns of employment for Aboriginal women differed from those of both Aboriginal men and white women."

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by Dr. Radut