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True Partners: Charting a New Deal for BC, First Nations and the Forests We Share [Ben Parfitt]

Author: 
Publisher: 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Year of publication: 
2007

“The central issue addressed in this paper is whether the numerous resource and revenue sharing agreements recently concluded between First Nations and the province are likely to be of lasting social, economic and environmental benefit. If they are not, and if successfully concluded treaties remain a long way off, are there things the province could do now to re-define how it shares forest resources and revenues with First Nations in a way that is more meaningful, equitable and just?”

What Makes First Nations Enterprises Successful? Lessons from the Harvard Project [Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs, JOPNA]

Publisher: 
Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA)
Year of publication: 
2006

"This paper examines how the actions of Native nations themselves can either undermine or strengthen their own enterprises, drawing on extensive research carried out by the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at Harvard University and the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy at the University of Arizona. Of course many of the things that determine business outcomes lie beyond the control of the nations that own the businesses.

Beyond the Blue and Green: The Need to Consider Aboriginal Peoples' Relationships to Resource Development in Labor-Environment Campaigns [Labor Studies Journal]

Publisher: 
Labor Studies Journal
Year of publication: 
2011

"In this article, I argue that labor researchers in North America need to engage more thoroughly with Indigenous studies if they hope to advance social and environmental justice. First, I suggest that researchers approach Aboriginal peoples’ relationships to the environment by supporting Aboriginal rights to lands and resources. Second, and related to this point, I raise the issue of the need for Aboriginal-controlled development in northern Aboriginal communities.

Aboriginal land rights and development: corporations and trust [International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, IJESB]

Publisher: 
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (IJESB)
Year of publication: 
2005

"Aboriginal people are seeking to regain control over their traditional lands and resources. Among other things, they expect these land and resources to form the foundation upon which they can rebuild their economies and communities. Aboriginal people want to pursue this development on their own terms. However many realise that success requires effective competition in the global economy and this in turn requires capacity beyond land and resource. One method of acquiring the needed capacity is through alliances with non-aboriginal corporations.

First Nations Economic Development: The Medow Lake Tribal Council [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"A new approach to economic development is emerging among the First Nations in Canada. This approach emphasizes the creation of profitable businesses competing in the global economy. These businesses are expected to help First Nations achieve their broader objectives that include: (i) greater control of activities on their traditional lands, (ii) self-determination, and (iii) an end to dependency through economic self-sufficiency.

Indigenous Land Rights, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Development in Canada: "Opting-in" to the Global Economy [Journal of World Business]

Publisher: 
Journal of World Business
Year of publication: 
2005

"Indigenous people are struggling to reassert their nationhood within the post-colonial states in which they find themselves. Claims to their traditional lands and the right to use the resources of these lands are central to their drive to nationhood. Traditional lands are the ‘place’ of the nation and are inseparable from the people, their culture, and their identity as a nation.

Inter-Indigenous development aid: markets, corporations and biases [The Canadian Geographer]

Publisher: 
The Canadian Geographer
Year of publication: 
2011

"The Canadian government and the Meadow Lake Tribal Council sponsored a forest extraction corporation in eastern Nicaragua that restructured 16 Miskitu and Mayangna villages and transformed local human-environment interactions. The Central American aid project demonstrated paternalistic and interventionist tendencies and exposed biases in inter-Indigenous aid that rendered it inseparable from conventional aid.

Legal Aspects of Aboriginal Business Development [LexisNexis Canada]

Publisher: 
LexisNexis Canada
Year of publication: 
2005

"Today is a time of economic rebirth for Aboriginal people in Canada. The federal government has committed billions of dollars to Aboriginal business initiatives, and courts are actively settling a range of claims. Innovative business models, new forms of property, and daring ventures and partnerships flourish across Canada, with many more planned. [...] Contributors include experienced practitioners and foremost academics of Aboriginal law from Canada and the United States.

Strong Policies, Poor Outcomes: Longitudinal Analysis of Forest Sector Contributions to Aboriginal Communities in Canada [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2006

"This paper examines the contribution of forestry and other resource sectors to the social and economic status of Aboriginal communities in Canada. First, we explore current conditions within Aboriginal communities and the ways in which social and economic status is thought to be related to factors such as size and location of community as well as access to resources, capital, and capacity. The paper also explores the changing relationship between Aboriginal communities and natural resource sectors by presenting results from descriptive statistics and longitudinal analysis of census data.

Property Rights, Resource Access, and Long-Run Growth [Journal of Empirical Legal Studies]

Publisher: 
Journal of Empirical Legal Studies
Year of publication: 
2011

"In this article we use four Canadian Supreme Court decisions that have substantively contributed to the constitutional recognition of aboriginal rights to assess the impact that changes in the security of commercial property rights have had on long-run macroeconomic performance. We use a series of event studies to measure the extent to which each court decision had an effect on the common share prices of Canadian forestry firms.

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by Dr. Radut