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Rights

The Indigenous Land Claims in New Zealand and Canada: From Grievance to Enterprise [Robert B. Anderson and Corinne Barnett]

Publisher: 
The Saskatchewan Institute of Public Policy
Year of publication: 
2006

“This paper explores the struggle by Indigenous people in Canada and New Zealand for the recognition of their rights to their traditional lands and resources and the role that these resources are expected to play, and indeed have played, in providing Aboriginal people and Maori the capacity to pursue development on their terms both economically and as ‘nations’ with Canada and New Zealand.”

Exploring the Constitutional Sources of a First Nation's Right To Tax [Canadian Tax Journal]

Publisher: 
Canadian Tax Journal (CTF)
Year of publication: 
2007

"Contends that the basis for generating revenues from property relies on one of two sources: section 91(3) of the Constitution Act of 1867, or section 35(1) of the Constitution Act of 1982 and that the scope of power may depend on which source has been used."

Growth of Enterprises in Aboriginal Communities [Conference Board of Canada]

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2006

"The growth of Aboriginal band-owned enterprises has reduced high unemployment levels and increased self-reliance. Growth of Enterprises in Aboriginal Communities highlights the economic success of five Aboriginal communities. These community businesses use strategic planning and standard business practices, while maintaining traditional Aboriginal values. All community members share the benefits. This report documents the experience of the Osoyoos Indian Band, Lac La Ronge Indian Band, Membertou First Nation, Mississauga's of the New Credit First Nation and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation.

First Nations’ involvement in forest governance in Quebec: The place for distinct consultation processes [The Forestry Chronicle]

Publisher: 
The Forestry Chronicle
Year of publication: 
2010

"Aboriginal peoples in Canada present a special case of citizen involvement in forest governance, with rights and status that go beyond those of other stakeholders and individuals. Increasingly, participation processes aimed specifically at Aboriginal representatives are being used to encourage their involvement in forest management. This article asks what would be the characteristics of a distinct process that could respond to Aboriginal rights, needs and expectations.

Status, Class and the Politics of Canadian Aboriginal Peoples [Studies in Political Economy]

Publisher: 
Studies in Political Economy
Year of publication: 
1997

"These comments express concerns of First Nations about their status in the economy, society and polity of Canada. Status may refer to a number of things: particular cultures or lifestyles; entitlement to or enjoyment of rights, privileges, legal capacities or powers granted by the state; or the awarding or denial of social honour or prestige. All three have been prominent in the North American Aboriginal experience."

Legal Aspects of Aboriginal Business Development [LexisNexis Canada]

Publisher: 
LexisNexis Canada
Year of publication: 
2005

"Today is a time of economic rebirth for Aboriginal people in Canada. The federal government has committed billions of dollars to Aboriginal business initiatives, and courts are actively settling a range of claims. Innovative business models, new forms of property, and daring ventures and partnerships flourish across Canada, with many more planned. [...] Contributors include experienced practitioners and foremost academics of Aboriginal law from Canada and the United States.

Aboriginal Participation in Forest Management Not Just Another Stakeholder [National Aboriginal Forestry Association, NAFA]

Publisher: 
National Aboriginal Forestry Association
Year of publication: 
2000

This paper is intended to provide a greater understanding of the nature of Aboriginal and treaty rights and how they interface with emerging forest policy. When one examines the essence of Aboriginal and treaty rights an early observation must be that these rights are largely about continued use of the forests. This obvious linkage has never been reconciled in forest policy, and where it counts most - at the provincial level. Only now is there some evidence that change may occur.

Forest Lands and Resources for Aboriginal People: An Intervenor Submission to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples [National Aboriginal Forestry Association, NAFA]

Publisher: 
National Aboriginal Forestry Association
Year of publication: 
1993

The objective of this submission is to provide the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples with analyses and options to overcome the inaccessibility to land and resources. Access to forest land resources could be achievable in several forms ranging through outright ownership, special long-term Aboriginal tenures, resource harvesting leases under existing provincial tenure systems, cooperative or joint management agreements, and decision-making or advisory roles in resource management and environmental assessment processes on traditional-use territories.

From the Fur Trade to Free Trade: Forestry and First Nations Women in Canada [Status of Women Canada]

Publisher: 
Status of Women Canada
Year of publication: 
2004

This report contributes to the discussion of women and trade agreements by making the connections between First Nations women, forestry and free trade. It includes a literature review divided into the following subject areas: gender and Aboriginal women, traditional roles, the fur trade, Aboriginal title and rights, and free trade and logging in First Nations communities.

A Guide to Mineral Exploration Legislation in Nova Scotia [Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources, NSDNR]

Publisher: 
Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources
Year of publication: 
2008

This report covers a wide range of information important to those wishing to participate in mineral development, including identification of mineral rights and acquiringand maintaining exploration licenses.

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by Dr. Radut