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Self-Determination

Success factors of Aboriginal women entrepreneurs: a study of Mohawk community in Canada [International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, IJESB]

Publisher: 
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (IJESB)
Year of publication: 
2006

"Research in indigenous entrepreneurship as well as women and entrepreneurship is growing. This paper presents 11 case studies on women Aboriginal entrepreneurs in Quebec, Canada. For Aboriginal peoples, small business and entrepreneurship is intimately linked to community and cultural survival. Within these communities, women assume major roles and are active participants and leaders in politics and in business. This research examines several models of entrepreneurship โ€“ traits, behavioural and environmental.

First Nations Economic Development: The Medow Lake Tribal Council [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"A new approach to economic development is emerging among the First Nations in Canada. This approach emphasizes the creation of profitable businesses competing in the global economy. These businesses are expected to help First Nations achieve their broader objectives that include: (i) greater control of activities on their traditional lands, (ii) self-determination, and (iii) an end to dependency through economic self-sufficiency.

Indigenous Land Claims and Economic Development: The Canadian Experience [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2004

Article includes a figure showing the Aboriginal approach to economic development, including the four purposes and three main processes. It also looks at whether the Aboriginal approach to development can deliver the results anticipated by the government (by 2016, Aboriginal people are projected to be making a $375 million contribution to the Canadian economy โ€“ as opposed to an estimated $11 billion cost should their circumstances remain as they were in 1996 relative to other Canadians โ€“ due to land claim settlements and other capacity-building activities by the government).

First Nations Bank of Canada: Interview with Mr. Keith Martell, Chair of the Board of Directors [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"On December 9, 1996, the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN) and TO Bank officially launched the First Nations Bank of Canada. The First Nations Bank of Canada is a schedule II chartered bank that serves Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal customers throughout Canada. It is the first such bank of its kind in North America, conceived, packaged and developed by Aboriginal People for Aboriginal People.

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by Dr. Radut