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Identity and the Language of the Classroom: Investigating the Impact of Heritage Versus Second Language Instruction on Personal and Collective Self-Esteem [Stephen C. Wright, Donald M. Taylor]

Publisher: 
Journal of Educational Psychology
Year of publication: 
1995

“The connection between heritage language instruction and self-esteem was investigated. Participants were Inuit, White, and mixed-heritage (Inuit-White) children living in a subarctic community. Testing occurred before and after their 1st year in a heritage language or a 2nd language program. Children from all 3 groups who were educated in their heritage language showed a substantial increase in their personal self-esteem, whereas Inuit and mixed-heritage children educated in a 2nd language did not.”

Look to the Mountain: An Ecology of Indigenous Education [Gregory Cajete]

Publisher: 
Eric
Year of publication: 
1994

“This book explores the nature of indigenous education, outlining key elements of American Indian perspectives on learning and teaching. It advocates developing a contemporary, culturally based, educational process founded upon traditional tribal values, orientations, and principles, while simultaneously using the most appropriate concepts, technologies, and content of modern education.”

Nunavut Sivuniksavut: "I see my culture in a different light and it makes me proud of who I am" [Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, AANDC]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Year of publication: 
2012

“Nunavut Sivuniksavut (NS) is a unique eight-month college program based in Ottawa. See how, in combination with traditional and cultural teachings, the NS program provides students with an opportunity to learn about Inuit history, organizations, land claims and other issues relevant to their future careers in Nunavut.”

Brave Spirits on New Paths: Toward a Globally Relevant Paradigm of Indigenous Entrepreneurship Research [Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, JSBE]

Publisher: 
Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship
Year of publication: 
2005

"This is the first study in a series aimed at strengthening research in the emerging field of Indigenous entrepreneurship. A literature survey revealed two dominant themes: the need to reconcile tradition with innovation and the need to understand how Indigenous world-views and values impact upon enterprise. Four relevant theoretical contexts guided an empirical investigation employing depth interviews with 40 selected opinion leaders representing two cultures: Indigenous Australian and American Indian.

A Comparison of Native Culture, Non-Native Culture and New Management Ideology [Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences
Year of publication: 
2009

"Based on a case study of a Native-operated criminal justice organization, this article uses Hofstede'sfive dimensions of national cultural differences to examine the connections between cultural values and management practices. It concludes that Hofstede's dimensions can provide insights into the differences between Native and non-Native cultures and how Native organizations may draw on traditional cultural values to improve organizational effectiveness. In general, Native cultures are described as collectivist, egalitarian, adaptive, and tolerant.

Indigenous perspectives on ecotourism development: a British Columbia case study [Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy

Publisher: 
Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
Year of publication: 
2012

"The purpose of this research is to examine Gitga'at First Nation approaches and objectives concerning the use of local biological and cultural resources through the lens of a locally-driven proposal to establish an eco-cultural tourism enterprise. [...] This research may be beneficial to other communities interested in eco-cultural tourism development or other development activities dependent on local resources use."

Hunters at the Margin: Native People and Wildlife Conservation in the Northwest Territories [University of British Columbia Press, UBCPress]

Publisher: 
University of British Columbia Press (UBCPress)
Year of publication: 
2008

"In the late nineteenth century, to the alarm of government conservationists, the North American plains bison population collapsed. Yet large herds of other big game animals still roamed the Northwest Territories, and Aboriginal people depended on them for food and clothing. Hunters at the Margin examines the conflict in the Northwest Territories between Native hunters and conservationists over three big game species: the wood bison, the muskox, and the caribou.

Development Corporations in Aboriginal Communities: The Canadian Experience [Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship]

Publisher: 
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship
Year of publication: 
2009

"This study examines the historical development of corporate governance structures in First Nations communities in British Columbia, where development corporations are employed to assist privately-owned and community-owned entrepreneurial enterprises. First Nations entrepreneurial activity functions in an environment where business must market to a global economy while preserving traditional values, beliefs and other cultural elements. A brief history of First Nations and their enterprise development efforts is presented.

Aboriginal entrepreneurs in the market economy: an exploration of alternative Aboriginal development [Concordia University]

Publisher: 
Concordia University
Year of publication: 
2004

"This thesis analyzes the influence of Aboriginal traditional values on Aboriginal economic activities and explores the possibilities of an alternative development of Canadian Aboriginal society. It argues that alternative Aboriginal development is possible in a way that emphasizes various social relations.

Economic Development and Innu Settlement: The Establishment of Sheshatshit [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)

"This paper documents the circumstances surrounding the comparatively recent settlement of the nomadic Inn of Labrador in a central community. State and health officials and agents of the church at the time initiated programs that focused on economic rehabilitation, formal education and health concerns which they felt would assist in integrating Innu into Canadian industrial society. Ultimately Innut had little choice but to comply with the wishes of these officials and settle when confronted with the difficulties of pursuing traditional practices."

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by Dr. Radut