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Trapping

Hunters at the Margin: Native People and Wildlife Conservation in the Northwest Territories [University of British Columbia Press, UBCPress]

Publisher: 
University of British Columbia Press (UBCPress)
Year of publication: 
2008

"In the late nineteenth century, to the alarm of government conservationists, the North American plains bison population collapsed. Yet large herds of other big game animals still roamed the Northwest Territories, and Aboriginal people depended on them for food and clothing. Hunters at the Margin examines the conflict in the Northwest Territories between Native hunters and conservationists over three big game species: the wood bison, the muskox, and the caribou.

Inuit Harvesting Rights [Nunatsiavut Government]

Publisher: 
2012
Year of publication: 
2012

"The Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement sets out Inuit fishing, hunting, trapping and gathering rights in the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area (LISA) and makes specific provisions for those who live outside of LISA. Harvesting issues are managed by the Renewable Resources division."

Ethnographies of Selected Reserves [Cape Breton University, CBU]

Publisher: 
Cape Breton University (CBU)
Year of publication: 
2012

The following ethnographies were researched and compiled by Mi'kmaw students hired through Aboriginal L.I.N.K.S. Each is a compendium of information about Nova Scotia reserves with regard to physical description including size, location, and proximity to other towns or villages; what businesses and other concerns comprise the reserves, including private businesses and band operated businesses; services and facilities available in the communities; and the names of the people who make up the band councils, administration, and educational institutions.

Impact of Delgamuukw Guidelines in Atlantic Canada [Cape Breton University, CBU]

Publisher: 
Cape Breton University (CBU)
Year of publication: 
1999

In Delgamuukw v. British Columbia, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed the inherent meaning of Aboriginal tenure (or title) and acknowledged its role in constitutional analysis. The message from the modern framers of the constitution of Canada and the Lamer Court is that Aboriginal law, tenure and rights as well as treaty rights constitute a distinct constitutional order in s. 35(1) of the Constitution Act, 1982, with its own implicate architecture, sources, traditions, and texts, that require constitutional equality with the other parts.

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by Dr. Radut