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Workforce

The Aboriginal Workforce: What Lies Ahead

Publisher: 
Canadian Labour and Business Centre
Year of publication: 
2004

This document discusses some of the traditions and realisms that surround the Aboriginal work force in Canada.

Self-Employment Benefit - Workforce Expansion [ Government of New Brunswick, GNB]

Publisher: 
Government of New Brunswick
Year of publication: 
2012

“The Workforce Expansion Self-Employment Benefit Program helps unemployed individuals create a job for themselves by starting a new business. The program provides various types of support during the initial development phase of the business including financial assistance, coaching and ongoing technical advice. Coaching is tailored to meet individual needs and can include subjects such as business plan development, accounting, and marketing.”

Widening the Circle – Increasing Opportunities for Aboriginal people in the workplace [Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited]

Publisher: 
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited

“In this document, we attempt to change the conversation about Aboriginal people in the workforce so that a new story can be written – one full of ideas for ensuring success in a wide range of career experiences.”

Community Economic Development Programs - At A Glance [Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, AANDC]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)
Year of publication: 
2010

This chart provides a brief overview of the Community Economic Development Programs available to First Nations Communities provided by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. The programs include the Community Economic Development Program (CEDP), Community Support Services Program (CSSP), Community Economic Opportunities Program (CEOP), Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business (PSAB), and Aboriginal Workforce Participation Initiative (AWPI).

Aboriginal People in Canada's Labour Market [Caledon Institute of Social Policy]

Publisher: 
Caledon Institute
Year of publication: 
1999

"Using data from the 1996 Census and the 1991 Census-based Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this report compares the job situation of Aboriginal people to that of the general population. The Aboriginal identity population (i.e., people who see themselves as Aboriginal) grew by 33 percent between 1991 and 1996, as opposed to just 6 percent for the non-Aboriginal population. Much of this growth is the result of the very "young" age profile of the Aboriginal population. In 1996, 35 percent of the Aboriginal identity population was under 15, compared to 20 percent for the whole population.

The Atlantic Aboriginal Post-Secondary Labour Force [Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program, AAEDIRP]

Publisher: 
Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Cheifs Secretariate (APC)
Year of publication: 
2010

This study examines the education and employment experiences of a cross-section of Aboriginal people in Atlantic Canada who completed post-secondary studies, as well as those who did not complete their studies, to identify possible barriers and challenges they experienced during their post-secondary studies and while searching for employment.

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by Dr. Radut