Jump to Navigation

Community

Aboriginal Women in Economic Development [Urban Aboriginal Economic Development, UAED]

Publisher: 
Urban Aboriginal Economic Development (UAED)
Year of publication: 
2009

"In October of 2008, the National Network for Urban Aboriginal Economic Development held a National Gathering to identify the next steps in the development of the Network. One critical issue identified in those discussions was the need to ensure a dedicated focus on Aboriginal women in urban areas. The participants recognized that Aboriginal women face particular barriers in becoming active members of the workforce, and in starting up and sustaining business enterprises. Members of the Network identified two key points.

Prosperity through Partnerships: Framing the Future of Aboriginal Economic Participation [Public Policy Forum]

Publisher: 
Public Policy Forum
Year of publication: 
2009

"To bring together industry leaders and Aboriginal organizations to share best practices in partnership building and promote further engagement from both communities, the Public Policy Forum organized a national workshop at The Westin in Ottawa on June 4, 2009, with a private reception the evening before.

Aboriginal Participation in Major Resource Development Opportunities [Public Policy Forum]

Publisher: 
Public Policy Forum
Year of publication: 
2012

"This national roundtable series convened leaders from Canada’s natural resources sector, Aboriginal communities and the public sector. The themes and issues discussed are summarized in the attached documents. A number of key themes were reflected in the dialogue, including: Labour Market Development; Community Readiness; Financing and Financial Literacy; Partnerships and Collaboration; Measurements of Success; Best Practices and Case Studies."

Creating Wealth in Aboriginal Communities [The Conference Board of Canada]

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2005

"Aboriginal leaders are determined to make their communities self-reliant by reducing their high unemployment and their dependence on government. They are doing that by creating wealth and employment through community-owned enterprises. Using case studies, Creating Wealth and Employment in Aboriginal Communities discusses six key factors that contribute to the success of Aboriginal community-owned enterprises."

Community-Based Learning Opportunities for Aboriginal People, Winner 2006: The Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada [Conference Board of Canada]

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2007

"The non-profit Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada (AFOA) works to enhance the financial and management practices and skills of Aboriginal people. It does so by providing relevant, accessible and up-to-date learning opportunities, and by sharing best practices using technology and e-learning practices. For instance, AFOA created the Aboriginal Centre for Finance and Management Excellence, a one-stop web portal for Aboriginal people across the country interested in this field.

Doing Community Economic Development [Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives, CCPA]

Publisher: 
Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
Year of publication: 
2007

"Challenging traditional notions of development, these essays critically examine bottom-up, community economic development strategies in a wide variety of contexts: as a means of improving lives in northern, rural and inner-city settings; shaped and driven by women and by Aboriginal people; aimed at employment creation for the most marginalized. Most authors have employed a participatory research methodology.

Sharing Canada's Prosperity - A Hand Up, Not a Handout [Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples]

Publisher: 
Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples
Year of publication: 
2007

"Aboriginal people share a common commitment to address the economic challenges facing their communities. Though not widely recognized, many communities throughout the country are beginning to experience economic success in areas ranging from small business development to larger scale commercial projects. Aboriginal people can, and have, succeeded on “their own terms”, adapting mainstream business practices to their own strongly held values and cultures. For complex reasons, others continue to struggle.

Indigenous Land Claims and Economic Development: The Canadian Experience [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2004

Article includes a figure showing the Aboriginal approach to economic development, including the four purposes and three main processes. It also looks at whether the Aboriginal approach to development can deliver the results anticipated by the government (by 2016, Aboriginal people are projected to be making a $375 million contribution to the Canadian economy – as opposed to an estimated $11 billion cost should their circumstances remain as they were in 1996 relative to other Canadians – due to land claim settlements and other capacity-building activities by the government).

Digital Divides and the 'First Mile': Framing First Nations Broadband Development in Canada [International Indigenous Policy Journal]

Publisher: 
International Indigenous Policy Journal (IIPJ)
Year of publication: 
2011

"Across Canada, rural and remote First Nations face a significant 'digital divide'. As self-determining autonomous nations in Canada, these communities are building broadband systems to deliver public services to their members and residents. To address this challenge, First Nations are working towards a variety of innovative, locally driven broadband development initiatives. This paper contributes a theoretical discussion that frames our understanding of these initiatives by drawing on the paradigm of the 'First Mile' (Paisley & Richardson, 1998).

Development of Aboriginal People's Community [Captus Press]

Author: 
Publisher: 
Captus Press
Year of publication: 
1991

"This book traces and analyses the recent evolution in thinking about the development of aboriginal people's communities. Since 1969, aboriginal people have set three goals for the future -- economic self-reliance, self-government, and cultural autonomy. Examples discussed in this book illustrate the central issues in economic, political and cultural development, how aboriginal people view those issues, and how they have set about solving development problems.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Community


Main menu 2

by Dr. Radut