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Economy

Journey To Success – Aboriginal Women’s Business Planning Guide [Native Management Services]

Publisher: 
Native Management Services

“This guide is the result of the attention paid to the needs of Aboriginal women entrepreneurs by federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal leaders working to strengthen Aboriginal participation in the economy.”

Key Research Issues on Urban Aboriginal Economic Development [Aboriginal Business Development Centre, ABDC]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Business and Community Development Centre (ABDC)
Year of publication: 
2008

"This Research Issues Paper is intended to guide discussions in the first stage of the Network, by identifying an initial set of issues which arise from the academic literature on urban Aboriginal communities. The Paper is organized around a series of contexts that confront those as they work to develop their economies, participate in the wage economy, and develop a business sector. These include:
1) the socio-demographic context
2) the jurisdictional context
3) the policy context
4) the institutional context, and
5) the program context.

Aboriginal Culture in the Digital Age [Public Policy Forum]

Publisher: 
Public Policy Forum
Year of publication: 
2005

"As the digital age continues to change Canada's social, political, and economic landscapes, Aboriginal peoples are responding. Having resisted overt assimilation and initiating a process of restoring identity, Aboriginal cultures face new challenges, such as the pervasive reality of information and communications technologies (ICT). These new technologies, especially the Internet, hold promise for Aboriginal nations. If used effectively and harnessed appropriately, ICT can be a valuable tool to propel forward their process of cultural renewal."

Historical Economic Perspectives of Aboriginal Peoples: Cycles of Balance and Partnership [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"Seeking understanding of Aboriginal peoples' place in today's society and ultimately for the future means understanding the history that has brought us here. It is not the history that solely acknowledges the Euro-Canadian perspective that will bring this understanding but it is an holistic approach that also respects the Aboriginal world view. This strategy draws on "ways of knowing" that honor written and oral traditions and is blended with a spiritual element that promotes a full appreciation for both approaches.

Indigenous Land Rights, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Development in Canada: "Opting-in" to the Global Economy [Journal of World Business]

Publisher: 
Journal of World Business
Year of publication: 
2005

"Indigenous people are struggling to reassert their nationhood within the post-colonial states in which they find themselves. Claims to their traditional lands and the right to use the resources of these lands are central to their drive to nationhood. Traditional lands are the ‘place’ of the nation and are inseparable from the people, their culture, and their identity as a nation.

Economic Development among the Aboriginal Peoples in Canada [Captus Press]

Author: 
Publisher: 
Captus Press
Year of publication: 
1999

"Aboriginal peoples in Canada and Indigenous peoples around the world are becoming increasingly active in economic development activities. To find a place in the new global economy, competitive business venture creations are emerging at the regional, national, and international level. This book explores economic development in order to achieve a greater understanding of this process."

Status, Class and the Politics of Canadian Aboriginal Peoples [Studies in Political Economy]

Publisher: 
Studies in Political Economy
Year of publication: 
1997

"These comments express concerns of First Nations about their status in the economy, society and polity of Canada. Status may refer to a number of things: particular cultures or lifestyles; entitlement to or enjoyment of rights, privileges, legal capacities or powers granted by the state; or the awarding or denial of social honour or prestige. All three have been prominent in the North American Aboriginal experience."

From subsistence to commercial fishing in Northern Canada, The experience of an Inuk entrepreneur [British Food Journal]

Publisher: 
British Food Journal
Year of publication: 
2006

Article shows how Native entrepreneurs have to not only overcome regulatory and economic difficulties, but also the moral dilemmas of breaking social norms. The business analyzed involved selling smoked, filleted and whole char to both wholesale and retail customers. In the north, sharing of food among people is a social norm given to how hard it is to survive there.

The Triumph of Maori Entrepreneurs or Diverse Economies [Aboriginal Policy Studies, APS]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Policy Studies (APS)
Year of publication: 
2011

"Tuaropaki Power Company is the first Maori geothermal power company—a successful power company that built its own power station and sells electricity to the national grid in Aotearoa, New Zealand. After wresting their lands back from government control, the people of the Tuaropaki Trust are now an inspiration for other tribes when it comes to charting an independent direction.

Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples: Economic Development [Library and Archives Canada]

Publisher: 
University of Saskatchewan
Year of publication: 
1992

Chapter 5: Economic Development - from the Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Includes the proceedings, comments and reports.

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by Dr. Radut