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Forestry

Assessing the impacts that market and policy changes in the forest industry have on communities in rural New Brunswick [Van A. Lantz and Yigezu A. Yigezu]

Publisher: 
University of New Brunswick
Year of publication: 
2002

“A two-sector computable general equilibrium model is calibrated to the New Brunswick community of Petitcodiac. Simulations are conducted for marginal reductions in both the price of lumber and the timber supply. We observe that both reductions have negative impacts on output and most production factors in the forest sector. Other production sectors tend to expand as production factors flow to where they receive their highest return.

Segregation of Women and Aboriginal People Within Canada's Forest Sector by Industry and Occupation [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)
Year of publication: 
2006

"This study examines employment segregation by gender and by Aboriginal ancestry within Canada's forest sector in 2001. Results show that while gender segregation was principally by occupation, segregation by Aboriginal ancestry was principally by industry sub-sector. White women were over represented in clerical occupations and Aboriginal men were over represented in woods based industries. Patterns of employment for Aboriginal women differed from those of both Aboriginal men and white women."

Ecosystem management and forestry planning in Labrador: how does Aboriginal involvement affect management plans? [Canadian Journal of Forest Research, CJFR]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Forest Research (CJFR)
Year of publication: 
2011

"Aboriginal peoples are increasingly being invited to participate in sustainable forest management processes as a means of including their knowledge, values, and concerns. However, it is justifiable to ask if this participation does lead to changes in forest management plans and to outcomes in management activities. We review four forest management plans over 10 years (1999–2009) in Labrador, Canada, to determine if increasing involvement by the Aboriginal Innu Nation has led to changes in plan content.

First Nations’ involvement in forest governance in Quebec: The place for distinct consultation processes [The Forestry Chronicle]

Publisher: 
The Forestry Chronicle
Year of publication: 
2010

"Aboriginal peoples in Canada present a special case of citizen involvement in forest governance, with rights and status that go beyond those of other stakeholders and individuals. Increasingly, participation processes aimed specifically at Aboriginal representatives are being used to encourage their involvement in forest management. This article asks what would be the characteristics of a distinct process that could respond to Aboriginal rights, needs and expectations.

Institutional Determinants of Profitable Commercial Forestry Enterprises among First Nations in Canada [Canadian Journal of Forest Research, CJFR]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Forest Research (CJFR)
Year of publication: 
2008

"This paper uses survey information to examine several common assertions about the institutional prerequisites for successful profitability when a First Nation enters an economic enterprise either independently or in joint effort with an outside firm. In the winter of 2004-2005, we interviewed managers on both the First Nations and private sides of joint ventures and other business alliances in Canada, to determine what affected their recent profitability experience. We gathered information on the ages, sizes, and activities of the firms.

Sustainable Community Economic Development in a Coastal Context: The Case of Alert Bay, British Columbia [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2002

"The following case study presents sustainable community economic development (SCED) as one path for achieving sustainable development within the setting of a fishing-dependent First Nations community along Canada's Pacific coastline. The study is based on the author's Masters research at Simon Fraser University as well as subsequent related research and development projects (1999-2001). The purpose of the initial study was to examine if and how a fishing-dependent community (Alert Bay, British Columbia) can utilize fisheries co-management as one component of an overall SCED strategy.

The use of joint ventures to accomplish Aboriginal economic development: two examples from British Columbia [International Journal of the Commons]

Publisher: 
International Journal of the Commons
Year of publication: 
2010

"Aboriginal economic development” differs from other forms of development by emphasizing aboriginal values and community involvement. Joint ventures, while providing business advantages, may not be able to contribute to aboriginal economic development. This paper examines two joint ventures in the interior of British Columbia to examine their ability or inability to contribute the extra dimensions of development desired by aboriginal communities.

A Comparison of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Entrepreneurs in the Quebec forestry Sector [International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business]

Publisher: 
International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal
Year of publication: 
2011

"This paper compares the portrait of forestry entrepreneurs within the Ilnu community of Mashteuiatsh to one of non-Aboriginal forestry entrepreneurs. The information was mainly collected using a survey in the winter of 2008 for the Aboriginal group and in the winter of 2007 for the non-Aboriginal group. Interviews were also conducted in situ with the Aboriginal forestry entrepreneurs, their principal clients, the Band Council (or local government) and the local economic development organisation.

Property Rights, Resource Access, and Long-Run Growth [Journal of Empirical Legal Studies]

Publisher: 
Journal of Empirical Legal Studies
Year of publication: 
2011

"In this article we use four Canadian Supreme Court decisions that have substantively contributed to the constitutional recognition of aboriginal rights to assess the impact that changes in the security of commercial property rights have had on long-run macroeconomic performance. We use a series of event studies to measure the extent to which each court decision had an effect on the common share prices of Canadian forestry firms.

Intersection and Integration of First Nations in the Canadian Forestry Sector: Implications for Economic Development [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2008

"In this paper, we examine the major issues affecting First Nations forestry in Canada using comparison of means tests and multivariate analysis. This paper will be of interest for those working in the economic development field, particularly those who are on the front-line of such changes and challenges. In some cases, economic development officers participated in the survey that we conducted. The results will present a snapshot of the larger issues affecting the current state of First Nations forestry."

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by Dr. Radut