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American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)

Relating Practice to Theory in Indigenous Entrepreneurship: a Pilot Investigation of the Kitsaki Partnership Portfolio [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2005

Article describes how economic participation must be on their own terms and for their own purposes. Also, traditional lands, history, culture and values all play a critical role in economic development. In order to attempt to compete in the global economy on their own terms, Indigenous people are using all types of partnerships, both among themselves and with non-Indigenous enterprises. A case study of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band is used as they are recognized as one of the leaders in economic development in Canada.

Indigenous Land Claims and Economic Development: The Canadian Experience [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2004

Article includes a figure showing the Aboriginal approach to economic development, including the four purposes and three main processes. It also looks at whether the Aboriginal approach to development can deliver the results anticipated by the government (by 2016, Aboriginal people are projected to be making a $375 million contribution to the Canadian economy – as opposed to an estimated $11 billion cost should their circumstances remain as they were in 1996 relative to other Canadians – due to land claim settlements and other capacity-building activities by the government).

Indigenous Economies, Theories of Subsistence, and Women: Exploring the Social Economy Model for Indigenous Governance [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2011

"The article consists of three sections. The first section discusses definitions and contemporary significance of subsistence and indigenous economies. It questions the prevailing narrow, economistic analyses and interpretations of subsistence. Although economic development projects such as resource extraction may improve fiscal independence and strengthen the economic base of indigenous communities, they also present serious threats to indigenous economies. The second section examines the relationship between subsistence and wage labor, particularly from the perspective of women.

Our Wealth Sits on the Table: Food, Resistance, and Salmon Farming in Two First Nations Communities [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2002

"The fishers living in Alert Bay and Ahousaht provided me with many details about how the distribution and abundance of various species had changed at and around salmon farming sites. I wanted to know how the Ahousaht's and Namgis' fishing activities had been altered by the presence of fish farms. However, the people I spoke to did not encourage questions concerning the fish farms as much as they did questions having to do with fish as food.

More Like Ourselves: Indigenous Capitalism through Tourism [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2010

"Indigenous peoples have been involved with tourism since they first hosted guests through exploratory and early colonial encounters, yet Indigenous ownership and control of such venues is a relatively new phenomenon worldwide. Indigenous tourism encompasses a wide range of experiences, including cultural tourism, ecotourism, adventure tourism, gaming, resorts, and other related services.

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by Dr. Radut