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Enterprise

Creating Wealth in Aboriginal Communities [The Conference Board of Canada]

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2005

"Aboriginal leaders are determined to make their communities self-reliant by reducing their high unemployment and their dependence on government. They are doing that by creating wealth and employment through community-owned enterprises. Using case studies, Creating Wealth and Employment in Aboriginal Communities discusses six key factors that contribute to the success of Aboriginal community-owned enterprises."

Institutional Determinants of Profitable Commercial Forestry Enterprises among First Nations in Canada [Canadian Journal of Forest Research, CJFR]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Forest Research (CJFR)
Year of publication: 
2008

"This paper uses survey information to examine several common assertions about the institutional prerequisites for successful profitability when a First Nation enters an economic enterprise either independently or in joint effort with an outside firm. In the winter of 2004-2005, we interviewed managers on both the First Nations and private sides of joint ventures and other business alliances in Canada, to determine what affected their recent profitability experience. We gathered information on the ages, sizes, and activities of the firms.

Relating Practice to Theory in Indigenous Entrepreneurship: a Pilot Investigation of the Kitsaki Partnership Portfolio [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2005

Article describes how economic participation must be on their own terms and for their own purposes. Also, traditional lands, history, culture and values all play a critical role in economic development. In order to attempt to compete in the global economy on their own terms, Indigenous people are using all types of partnerships, both among themselves and with non-Indigenous enterprises. A case study of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band is used as they are recognized as one of the leaders in economic development in Canada.

Indigenous Land Claims and Economic Development: The Canadian Experience [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2004

Article includes a figure showing the Aboriginal approach to economic development, including the four purposes and three main processes. It also looks at whether the Aboriginal approach to development can deliver the results anticipated by the government (by 2016, Aboriginal people are projected to be making a $375 million contribution to the Canadian economy – as opposed to an estimated $11 billion cost should their circumstances remain as they were in 1996 relative to other Canadians – due to land claim settlements and other capacity-building activities by the government).

Regional Clustering Model of Aboriginal Women: Aboriginal Women and Economic Development Feasibility Study Report [Women's Economic Council]

Publisher: 
Women's Economic Council
Year of publication: 
2011

"This report provides evidence that Aboriginal women and other marginalized women can be supported more fully to participate, lead and grow self-employment initiatives and entrepreneurial enterprises in Canada."

Brave Spirits on New Paths: Toward a Globally Relevant Paradigm of Indigenous Entrepreneurship Research [Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, JSBE]

Publisher: 
Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship
Year of publication: 
2005

"This is the first study in a series aimed at strengthening research in the emerging field of Indigenous entrepreneurship. A literature survey revealed two dominant themes: the need to reconcile tradition with innovation and the need to understand how Indigenous world-views and values impact upon enterprise. Four relevant theoretical contexts guided an empirical investigation employing depth interviews with 40 selected opinion leaders representing two cultures: Indigenous Australian and American Indian.

Indigenous perspectives on ecotourism development: a British Columbia case study [Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy

Publisher: 
Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
Year of publication: 
2012

"The purpose of this research is to examine Gitga'at First Nation approaches and objectives concerning the use of local biological and cultural resources through the lens of a locally-driven proposal to establish an eco-cultural tourism enterprise. [...] This research may be beneficial to other communities interested in eco-cultural tourism development or other development activities dependent on local resources use."

Development Corporations in Aboriginal Communities: The Canadian Experience [Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship]

Publisher: 
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship
Year of publication: 
2009

"This study examines the historical development of corporate governance structures in First Nations communities in British Columbia, where development corporations are employed to assist privately-owned and community-owned entrepreneurial enterprises. First Nations entrepreneurial activity functions in an environment where business must market to a global economy while preserving traditional values, beliefs and other cultural elements. A brief history of First Nations and their enterprise development efforts is presented.

The Applied Theory of First Nations Economic Development: A Critique [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2005

"Founded by Professors Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt at Harvard University in 1987, The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development (The Harvard Project) aims to understand and foster the conditions under which sustained, self-determined, social and economic development may be achieved among American Indian nations. The project has become something of a benchmark for current discussion of First Nations economic development.

Indigenous Entrepreneurship Research: Themes and Variations [International Research in the Business Disciplines]

Publisher: 
International Research in the Business Disciplines
Year of publication: 
2006

"The purpose of this paper is to offer an overview of the current study of indigenous entrepreneurship. First, while there is broad agreement on the application of the term “indigenous,” there are differences of emphasis and outright controversies about empirical description of indigenous people, especially concerning the role of ownership and private property in their culture and traditions.Second, the concept of entrepreneurship is as controversial in this field as elsewhere in management studies.

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by Dr. Radut